Slate culture gabfest online dating


09-Aug-2019 10:13

There’s money behind these shows, and it costs to listen to them (Spotify has its no-adverts, paid-for service; Audible requires you to pay after you’ve uploaded one series).

They have a capitalist ethos that seems to go against the feel of many one-producer-and-their-microphone podcasts.

Young knows how to sprinkle just the right amount of celebrity stardust on the proceedings, talking about the tricky business of juggling his role as a pop star with his sexuality.

Most importantly, he’s genuinely interested in what the guests have to say.

t wasn’t so long ago that every podcast article began with an explanation of what a podcast actually is: how to find one, the difference between a podcast and a radio programme … News stories are broken on podcasts, legal situations changed: , has had legal repercussions, too.

The most long-standing shows have fans that have listened for a decade or more; and such podcasts constantly garner new listeners, who binge for days until they’re all caught up.

, where actor Craig Parkinson interviews his compadres about their careers, is a delight.

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Audiences for podcasts are huge and growing rapidly.

Here, he brings together academics and celebrity guests to help him on his “voyage of learning”.

It’s a mixed bag: Frankie Boyle drops in to talk about nihilism and fatherhood, Will Storr offers a perspective on narcissism and selfies, and Billy Bragg offers a theory about art, protest and why grime is so important.

Highlights include a slipper-clad Vicky Mc Clure talking about being discovered by Shane Meadows, the very modest Lauren Socha’s shock at getting a film role, and Joseph Gilgun opening up about how his anxiety kicks in.

It’s hard to imagine Parkinson without his menacing face on, but the affable host brings out the best in his interviewees over a cup of tea. Or has he just detached himself from his old life out of choice?wasn’t true crime, but its week-by-week tracking-down of Simmons was a rolling mystery.